Date   

test

Naumann, Robert, W5OV
 

Just a test message of the new ARRL-Education discussion group, moderated by K5ATA


Welcome

Anthony Luscre
 

Thanks for starting this group.
I am the Ohio Section Yout Coordinator, A license class instructor, content creator and website host (www.k8zt.com).
Other than education my favorite AR activities- Operating, DXing, Contesting, QRP, All modes, Satellites, etc.


Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Steve Goodgame K5ATA
 

Welcome everyone to our new ARRL Education and Learning group! This group was created for you as a place to share ideas, ask questions, and discuss best practices regarding ways to implement amateur radio and wireless technology into classrooms. To help create a sense of community, lets use this thread as an introduction thread.  I'll start.

My name is Steve Goodgame, I am the new Education and Learning Manager at ARRL. I started this position in September. I taught in Texas and Mississippi for a combined total of 21 years, several of which I had the opportunity to teach amateur radio to my students, who I called my Padawans.  I am passionate about getting youth into this great hobby.  My favorite ham radio activity is activating parks for POTA with my daughter, Jherica (KI5HTA) and my wife, Cyndi (K5CYN)


Re: Welcome

Steve Goodgame K5ATA
 

Glad to have you, Anthony!


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Steve Wilson
 

Evening

My name is Steve Wilson, KJ6BNA, and I am currently employed (part-time) with DHS/FEMA as a HF Communications Manager. Have taught ARRL Education classes at a college in Northern California for 9 years and taught a class for emergency radio operators in Puerto Rico a couple of years ago.

 

You won't be able to hear me on the radio, my interest is experimenting and building radio networks. Spent 10 years building a series of radio networks for a power company telemetry and for their Land Mobile Radio network covering hundreds of square miles in a very remote area.

 

At one time in my career I work on the communications for the last Apollo Space Mission.

 

Goals are to learn to use Arduino to teach radio electronics – hope ARRL will offer a hands on in the future. The best experience I had was when I attended three of the ARRL Teachers Institute on Wireless Technology with Mark.

 

73

Steve Wilson

 

 

From: ARRL-Education@... <ARRL-Education@...> On Behalf O3f Steve Goodgame K5ATA
Sent: Friday, December 10, 2021 7:36 PM
To: ARRL-Education@...
Subject: [ARRL-Education] Welcome: Introduce yourself!

 

Welcome everyone to our new ARRL Education and Learning group! This group was created for you as a place to share ideas, ask questions, and discuss best practices regarding ways to implement amateur radio and wireless technology into classrooms. To help create a sense of community, lets use this thread as an introduction thread.  I'll start.

My name is Steve Goodgame, I am the new Education and Learning Manager at ARRL. I started this position in September. I taught in Texas and Mississippi for a combined total of 21 years, several of which I had the opportunity to teach amateur radio to my students, who I called my Padawans.  I am passionate about getting youth into this great hobby.  My favorite ham radio activity is activating parks for POTA with my daughter, Jherica (KI5HTA) and my wife, Cyndi (K5CYN)


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Bob Houghton
 

Hello, my name is Bob Houghton AD6QF. I am a retired high school physics teacher. Over my career, I have had about 40 students get licensed. I was fortunate to attend two Teacher Institutes with Mark Spencer. Those two TI workshops were among the best in my teaching career. While I am no longer in the classroom, I am still very interested in helping to create the next generation of hams. One challenge I faced is that my students were often seniors. They would get interested in ham radio, study and get licensed and participate in a few school club activities and then graduate. A few continued their amateur radio activity in college, one becoming an officer in the Stanford Amateur Radio Club. Many have gone on to engineering and other professional careers. When I check QRZ, I can see that many have renewed their licenses after 10 years, but I can find no evidence of on-the-air activity. So my interest is finding ways to help young hams bridge the gap between getting licensed and becoming active in the hobby. ARRL has had many initiatives to attract new hams, but I think we need to find ways to get them on the air and active in some meaningful way. I think YOTA is a good effort in this direction.


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Steve Wilson
 

Good to meet you Bob 

On requirement for new Amateur Radio Operators in England is most local clubs incorporate simple circuit building into their training. I believe we can do the same in our teaching. 

This blends well to inspire students to advance their studies. 

I have also had many seniors in my classes — they are a joy to teach. 

Please excuse typos, brevity, and lack of nuance
Sent from the road
Steve Wilson 

On Dec 10, 2021, at 8:31 PM, Bob Houghton via groups.arrl.org <rowland_physics=yahoo.com@...> wrote:

Hello, my name is Bob Houghton AD6QF. I am a retired high school physics teacher. Over my career, I have had about 40 students get licensed. I was fortunate to attend two Teacher Institutes with Mark Spencer. Those two TI workshops were among the best in my teaching career. While I am no longer in the classroom, I am still very interested in helping to create the next generation of hams. One challenge I faced is that my students were often seniors. They would get interested in ham radio, study and get licensed and participate in a few school club activities and then graduate. A few continued their amateur radio activity in college, one becoming an officer in the Stanford Amateur Radio Club. Many have gone on to engineering and other professional careers. When I check QRZ, I can see that many have renewed their licenses after 10 years, but I can find no evidence of on-the-air activity. So my interest is finding ways to help young hams bridge the gap between getting licensed and becoming active in the hobby. ARRL has had many initiatives to attract new hams, but I think we need to find ways to get them on the air and active in some meaningful way. I think YOTA is a good effort in this direction.


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Neil Rapp WB9VPG
 
Edited

Hi!  I'm Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.  I am an instructional designer and chemistry instructor in Union, KY just across the river from Cincinnati.  Currently, I'm teaching at Xavier University in Cincinnati and Bluegrass Community & Technical College in Lexington, KY.  For the last 28 years, I've taught high school chemistry and sponsored ham radio clubs at Bloomington High School South (K9SOU) in Bloomington, IN and Harrison High School (WA9HHS) in Evansville, IN.  We were extremely active in contesting and School Club Roundup until COVID happened.  I was the president of the University of Southern Indiana (W9MOK) ARC in Evansville, IN during undergrad.  I'm a graduate of TI-1 with WA8SME and TI-2 with N8MS.  I'm also a member of the ARISS-US Education Committee and the IARU Region 2 Youth Working Group (YOTA). I've been a ham since age 5, so youth in ham radio is my passion.

For the last 2 years, I've been organizing Youth on the Air (YOTA) for the Americas.  I was the camp director for our first camp in 2021, and will be the director for 2022 before handing the responsibilities off to the youth and stepping into a consulting role.  Our focus with YOTA is retaining and building a community of our licensed youth in ham radio, primarily high school and college students so far.  In the longer range plan, we hope to offer some camps for the 10-15 year old range as well. We are currently in December YOTA month, a special event around the world with all operators under the age of 26.  If you haven't seen the video highlights from camp, check us out on YouTube at Youth on the Air!  Our website is youthontheair.org.

73,
Neil WB9VPG


Re: Welcome

Paulo Sousa
 

Hello my friends

    I'm Paulo Sousa CT1FUH.

    A have a school Group of young boys and girls to learn Ham radio. 
    The call is CS5GVA.

      Please take a look in to QRZ.com for CS5GVA or previoselly CS2GVA.

    73´s

      Paulo Sousa CT1FUH   
      Hamradio teacher for CS5GVA 

Steve Goodgame K5ATA <sgoodgame@...> escreveu no dia sábado, 11/12/2021 à(s) 02:36:

Glad to have you, Anthony!


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Paulo Sousa
 

          Hi,   

           I'm Paulo Sousa CT1FUH and I'm a history teacher. I have a scholar group for Hamradio in Portugal
           The club call is CS5GVA and you can see us on QRZ.com. 

           Why ham radio into an official school? 
            I did academic work in 2013 to prove the importance of the school clubs.
            In this work we studied the contribution of school clubs in the promotion of learning with regards to educational success. 
            This case study took place in Gouveia Interschools Network and focused on a group of students who attend the school amateur radio club. 
            Our aim was to analyze – and possibly confirm- the positive effects of the students' involvement in extracurricular activities like the amateur radio club on their personal development and academic achievement. 
            The growing importance that amateur radio has gained in this school context, as well as the advantages it presents for students and the school community - both from a social and solidarity point of view - justify the choice of this object of investigation. Forty seven students - who are members of the radio club -, sixteen teachers, five parents, and the researcher as a participant observer, participated in this research. 
            The dissertation begins by presenting a theoretical approach to extracurricular activities and school clubs. It draws on a framework of what amateur radio is, either as a hobby or as an aid in the development of academic skills. The history of the club's communications in Gouveia Interschools Network is told from its beginning to the present days.
            The second part presents the methodology adopted for this case study, as well as the analysis of the information gathered through the “insider” investigator's observations, testimonials from the students who participated in the club, the data collected from surveys administered to the club students and to the teachers connected to these students, and the interviews to the students’ parents. We also analyzed data related to the activities of the club, to the student’s level of satisfaction from attending the school, dynamics of inclusion, personal and social skills, school performance, general knowledge, the school dropout rates and school results. This study showed the high value added by extracurricular activities and nonformal education. Finally it also demonstrated that clubs are an important part of the students’ curriculum options because they offer them extra motivation beyond the national curriculum. The important role that an amateur radio club plays in a school is hereby confirmed.

      73´s      CT1FUH Paulo Sousa
            

Neil Rapp WB9VPG via groups.arrl.org <neilrapp=yahoo.com@...> escreveu no dia sábado, 11/12/2021 à(s) 18:08:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi!  I'm Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.  I am an instructional designer and chemistry instructor in Union, KY just across the river from Cincinnati.  Currently, I'm teaching at Xavier University in Cincinnati and Bluegrass Community & Technical College in Lexington, KY.  For the last 28 years, I've taught high school chemistry and sponsored ham radio clubs at Bloomington High School South (K9SOU) in Bloomington, IN and Harrison High School (WA9HHS) in Evansville, IN.  We were extremely active in contesting and School Club Roundup until COVID happened.  I was the president of the University of Southern Indiana (W9MOK) ARC in Evansville, IN during undergrad.  I'm a graduate of TI-1 with WA8SME and TI-2 with N8MS.  I'm also a member of the ARISS-US Education Committee and the IARU Region 2 Youth Working Group (YOTA). I've been a ham since age 5, so youth in ham radio is my passion.

For the last 2 years, I've been organizing Youth on the Air (YOTA) for the Americas.  I was the camp director for our first camp in 2021, and will be the director for 2022 before handing the responsibilities off to the youth and stepping into a consulting role.  Our focus with YOTA is retaining and building a community of our licensed youth in ham radio, primarily high school and college students so far.  In the longer range plan, we hope to offer some camps for the 10-15 year old range as well. We are currently in December YOTA month, a special event around the world with all operators under the age of 26.  If you haven't seen the video highlights from camp, check us out on YouTube at Youth on the Air!  Our website is youthontheair.org.

73,
Neil WB9VPG


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Dan Romanchik KB6NU
 
Edited

Hi all,

Dan, KB6NU, here. I'm the author of the KB6NU Ham Radio Blog and the No Nonsense amateur radio license study guides and have been teaching amateur radio license classes for nearly 20 years now. I am also Communications Manager for Amateur Radio | Digital Communications (ARDC), a private foundation that administers AMPRNet (also known as 44Net) and makes grants to worthy programs in amateur radio and digital communications.

On my blog, there are several posts that address how to get more young people into amateur radio. My post today, #hamradio needs something like the Arduino, is a case in point. I don't have the answers, but I do ask the questions. At any rate, I'm happy to join the group and to discuss these topics with you all.

As far as my other ham radio activities go, I like to build things and operate CW. I'm the author of the CW Geek's Guide to Having Fun with Morse Code and will be giving a talk on having fun with CW at Hamcation this coming February. I'm also a member of the CWops and the Long Island CW Club. If you ever hear me on the air, please give me a call.

73, Dan KB6NU


Re: Welcome

Godwin Masakadza
 

Good day Paulo et al
My name is Godwin V51MG.I am based in Namibia.
I teach Radio  communication(City and Guilds qualifications) at a startup College in Windhoek Namibia.

Regards
Godwin

On Sun, 12 Dec 2021, 01:02 Paulo Sousa, <ct1fuh@...> wrote:
Hello my friends

    I'm Paulo Sousa CT1FUH.

    A have a school Group of young boys and girls to learn Ham radio. 
    The call is CS5GVA.

      Please take a look in to QRZ.com for CS5GVA or previoselly CS2GVA.

    73´s

      Paulo Sousa CT1FUH   
      Hamradio teacher for CS5GVA 

Steve Goodgame K5ATA <sgoodgame@...> escreveu no dia sábado, 11/12/2021 à(s) 02:36:
Glad to have you, Anthony!


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

craig.seay@...
 
Edited

Hello
My name is Craig Seay, KF0DGQ, and am switching career tracks in three weeks, I'll be teaching Network Fundamentals, Network Cabling-Copper, and Network Cabling-Fiber Optic at the high school level. Since towers, IOT, IIOT, and RF are part of the coursework, why not introduce licensing, building antennas/radios, careers in response agencies in the classroom too and see where their interest lies.

Cheers
73
Craig

 


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

J Edgar McDermott
 

Greetings to the Group. My name is J. E. McDermott/K9JEM. I have been licensed since 1977, but working in one form or another in communications and electronics since 1969 when I joined the Navy and became an Electronics Technician for Communications. I’ve taught licensing classes on Guam, in Texas, and South Africa. My final three years with the Department of State was as an instructor for VHF, UHF, and HF communications systems operations.

--
J. Edgar McDermott


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Rebecca Haynes
 

Hello Everyone, 
  My name is  Rebecca,  I  have been a H.A.M. since 2019. First introduction was by a fellow H.A.M. operator at my school who was our SRO. Was invited to the teachers institute to learn more and  implement robotics and circuitry. I am looking to connect with  this community to best serve those who are underrepresented and extend equity . Currently, I am the Magnet coordinator at a Title 1 High school and I want to expose students to circuitry, robotics and electronics.Please provide insight and feedback. looking forward to collaborating with you  all. 

Respectfully,
Rebecca 


On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 8:20 AM J Edgar McDermott <mcdermottje@...> wrote:
Greetings to the Group.  My name is J. E. McDermott/K9JEM.  I have been licensed since 1977, but working in one form or another in communications and electronics since 1969 when I joined the Navy and became an Electronics Technician for Communications.  I’ve taught licensing classes on Guam, in Texas, and South Africa.  My final three years with the Department of State was as an instructor for VHF, UHF, and HF communications systems operations. 

--
J. Edgar McDermott






--
Respectfully,
Rebecca  Haynes 


Introduction N5CQ

John Langdon
 

My name is John Langdon. I was originally licensed in 1966 as WN5PUQ and was assigned N5CQ in 1977. I have BSEE and MBA degrees from UT Austin, and after retirement from an engineering and management career I completed the UTeach post baccalaureate program and am certified in Texas to teach math, physics, and engineering in grades 8-12. I am also a “UTeach Maker Fellow” My primary interest in the education arena is in helping to developed project based and hands on instruction for STEM students.

 

73 John N5CQ

N5CQ@...

 


School Ham Stations in Maryland (Introducing N8PK)

Pat
 

Hello fellow explorers! 

Technology education and outreach has been a passion of mine for years, as seen in the student interns I have employed and mentored at my workplace, the high-altitude balloon payloads & experiments flown, as a CubeSat satellite bus & ground station technical consultant, as a co-developer of the AMSAT CubeSat Simulator, and from my many technical-fun visits to school locations.

My first question to this group is: does anyone know of or have a list of schools in the state of Maryland that has a secure and active ham radio station on site (or one in development)? 

If so then please advise me soon, with contact info if possible. 

Thank you very much for your support. 

Best 73 de N8PK,

Pat Kilroy
electrical engineer
Greenbelt, Md. 
301-286-1984 work

Sykesville, Md. home
 


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Ross Tucker (NS7F)
 

Good morning!

My name is Ross Tucker. I'm a physics instructor at Arizona State University. I also teach part-time at the Herberger Young Scholars Academy, a school for gifted teens. I've been teaching full-time since I finished my PhD in 2016. However, education has been a lifelong passion for me. I was touring the state giving educational presentations to fourth-graders when I was only 12 years old. My interest in amateur radio goes back almost as far - I got licensed in high school and have been exploring one aspect or another of ham radio since then. My principal ham interests at the moment are SOTA (Summits on the Air) and leading my club's Field Day committee.

Ross Tucker, PhD, NS7F


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Sterling Mann (N0SSC)
 

I'm Sterling, N0SSC.

I'm not a teacher, but Steve invited me anyway 🙂

I am a co-founder for Youth on the Air in IARU Region 2 (for which Neil WB9VPG is the camp director and all-around do-it-all guy), president of the Young Amateur's Radio Community (https://yarc.world), and current IARU R2 Liaison for Youth. I have a lot of irons in the fire regarding youth in amateur radio, which puts me in a unique position to bridge gaps between the youth population of amateur radio and all of you fine educators of said youth.

I do just about everything in ham radio, contesting being one of my favorite activities. By day I'm a communication systems / RF engineer for a fairly large aerospace company in St. Louis, MO.

Thanks for the invite, Steve, and thank you for all the work you're doing!

73,
Sterling N0SSC


Re: Welcome: Introduce yourself!

Billy Crow
 

My name is Billy Crow, K5LUO.  I am a teacher at Tecumseh High School, Oklahoma.  I teach Basic Electronics and Amateur Radio.  I started the program in 2019 after talking with the school superintendent about introducing students to basic electronics/amateur radio.  I gave a demonstration to him and the principles, of amateur radio.  They were all amazed and the program started in January 2020.  Covid hit, and really put a damper on things but I continued teaching on the internet.  I applied for a contact with the International Space Station through ARISS and was approved for a contact in December of 2020.  We began working on a future contact, in late spring through the fall of 2020.  That was an experience to say the least!  We were set up for a contact for December 4, 2020.  By then, our school was back in temporary session for in person and internet teaching.   We were worried that we might not be able to do it.  However, our superintendent was very supportive of this once in a life time event.  We proceeded on.  On December 4, 2020, at approximately 11:30 am CST, our dreams and goal were reached.  We made contact with NA1SS with Astronaut and Dr. Shannon Walker.   Everything worked....equipment and students performed above and beyond what was expected!  Our students, school faculty and parents were so excited, even to the point of tears of joy.  What a great time!  Here is the web address of the contact  https://w5nor.org/k5ths/
I received a grant from ARRL for books and 2 radios.  A local club, Pottawatomie County Amateur Radio Club, has helped tremendously with teaching and equipment.  We were able to put up a 50' tower, with a DMR repeater (Oklahoma Central Talkgroup).  The club donated several radios and other equipment from SK's and others.  The school has supported me in this adventure 100%.  
Some of the things I am teaching.......soldering, Arduino experiments, building antennas, basic electronics and numerous other amateur radio related topics.  We are in the process of forming the Tecumseh High School Amateur Radio Club.  Our callsign is K5THS.

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